Two key documents that are supposed to be attractive to the rulers of the Princes. The first was the status quo agreement and the second the instrument of accession. The status quo agreement, which confirmed that the practices and agreements between the princely states and British India were now being pursued by independent India. The instrument of accession by which the sovereign of the princely states accepted the accession of his kingdom to independent India. The nature of the subject varied. In November 1947, Hyderabad signed a status quo agreement with India`s rule, which perpetuated all the agreements reached so far, with the exception of the deployment of Indian troops in the state. In September 1948, after a year of negotiations and an economic blockade imposed by India, India invaded Hyderabad and annexed it. [15] The Nizam then signed an instrument of accession and joined India. [16] The Kalat Khanate, on pakistan`s western periphery, has also decided to remain independent. It has signed a status quo agreement with Pakistan. Hyderabad violated all the clauses of the agreement: externally, by plotting with Pakistan, to which it secretly lent £15 million; in defense through the construction of a large semi-private army; in communication, by disrupting border traffic and transit traffic of Indian Railways. [18] India has also been accused of violating the agreement by imposing an economic blockade. It turned out that the state of Mumbai was disrupting the supply of Hyderabad without Delhi`s knowledge.

The government has promised to include the file with provincial governments, but scholar Lucien Benichou says this has never happened. India also delayed India`s arms shipments to Hyderabad, which was later described as a violation of the status quo agreement. [19] The two draft contracts were submitted to the Prince`s Chamber on 25 July. A state negotiating committee, composed of ten sovereigns and twelve ministers, was set up to discuss the two agreements. After discussion, the Committee finalised the two draft agreements on 31 July. [3] AND CONSIDERING that it is advantageous for both parties that existing administrative agreements and arrangements on matters of common interest are maintained until a final agreement such as this is reached: it is significant that the agreement did not provide for the Dominion of India to deploy Indian forces in the state, while British India had retained various cantonments; especially in Secunderabad, as part of its « subsidiary alliance » with the state. . . .

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